Walter Sinnott-Armstrong tagged posts

morality

The Moral Argument for God

In his dialogue with Euthyphro, Socrates asks, “Is the pious loved by the gods because it is pious? Or is it pious because it is loved by the gods?” To put the dilemma in more modern terms: does God command an action because it is good, or is an action good because God commands it? If the former is true, then the good exists independently of God. If the latter is true, then a question arises concerning the arbitrariness of moral obligations...

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God? A Debate Between a Christian and an Atheist

The question of god’s existence has long been a subject of debate among philosophers, not to mention laypersons. It’s one thing to believe that a higher intelligent mind is behind the origin of the universe, and it’s quite another to offer arguments in defense or refutation of that belief. Yet more problematic is how we define such a being, what attributes and characteristics we ascribe to it, and to what degree any arguments for god actually resemble the god most people seem to believe in. These issues and more are taken up in the 2003 book, God? A Debate Between a Christian and an Atheist.

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Morality Without God?

Is it possible to be a moral person and not believe in god? Are there such things as objective moral values if god does not exist? In the eyes of many, such questions may seem rather silly. ‘Of course, you don’t need to believe in god to be good, nor does there need to be a god for some things to be really wrong or really right...

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why be a good person

Why Be a Good Person?

‘If there’s no God and no life beyond the grave, doesn’t that mean that men will be allowed to do whatever they want?’
‘Didn’t you know that already?’ he said and laughed again. ‘An intelligent man can do anything he likes as long as he’s clever enough to get away with it.’1

The above passage from Dostoevsky is often cited by religious apologists with the intent to either denounce atheism as immoral, or to suggest that atheists are incapable of accounting for the moral judgments they hold. James Spiegel, in his book The Making of an Atheist: How Immorality Leads to Unbelief, embodies the opin...

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Walter Sinnott-Armstrong v. William Lane Craig

This debate took place on April 1, 2000 at Wooddale Church in Eden Prairie, Minnesota. Atheist philosopher Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, professor at Duke University and author of numerous books on ethics and morality,1 argues in the affirmative on the question, “Does evil and suffering disprove God?” William Lane Craig, a well-known Christian philosopher and apologist who also has a lengthy list of books in his name,2 argues the negative...

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