Category Philosophical Arguments

The Moral Argument for God

In his dialogue with Euthyphro, Socrates asks, “Is the pious loved by the gods because it is pious? Or is it pious because it is loved by the gods?” To put the dilemma in more modern terms: does God command an action because it is good, or is an action good because God commands it? If the former is true, then the good exists independently of God. If the latter is true, then a question arises concerning the arbitrariness of moral obligations...

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The Cosmological Argument for God

Cosmological arguments are arguments that infer the existence of god from certain facts about the universe. These arguments, employed at least since the time of the ancient Greeks, are intended to show that the existence of the universe cannot be explained without reference to a creator. For this article, we will look at three formulations of the cosmological argument which are generally considered to be more popular and persuasive than other versions.

I. Aquinas’ Contingency Argument

In his classic treatise, the Summa Theologica, the 13th century theologian Thomas Aquinas proposed five argum...

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The Transcendental Argument for God

The Transcendental Argument for God (to be hencefore referred to as TAG) is a philosophical argument which attempts to demonstrate that some facet of reality presupposes the existence of god. As Greg Bahnsen, one of the leading proponents of the argument, puts it, a “transcendental argument begins with any item of experience or belief whatsoever and proceeds, by critical analysis, to ask what conditions (or what other beliefs) would need to be true in order for that original experience or belief to make sense, be meaningful, or be intelligible to us.”1

In use of the TAG, the experience, or fa...

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The Ontological Argument for God

The ontological argument for god’s existence has taken several different forms throughout history, but the most popular version is that of the 11th century philosopher and theologian Saint Anselm of Canterbury. Anselm argued that we can imagine a being which is greater than all else.1 He went on to claim that this being cannot solely exist in the imagination, since an even greater being would be one that exists in reality and is not dependent on our conception of it. This being Anselm labeled “god...

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The Argument from Divine Hiddenness

If god has delivered a message to humanity, as Jews, Christians, and Muslims believe, then god wants something of us. The purpose of sending a message is to communicate something that you at least want to be known. Revelation is the alleged method by which god delivers a message, and according to most theists, the message god imparts to us is one of love, with the intent that we repent and believe...

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What Do We Mean By ‘God’?

If I were to tell you that a ghreasch exists, a look of confusion would undoubtedly come across your face. Without knowing what a ghreasch is, you have no possible way of comprehending the meaning of my statement. All you can gather from the information provided is that some unknown thing occupies a place somewhere in our physical universe. Now suppose I told you that this ghreasch cares deeply for you and is the most important thing in all of existence. Odds are good that you will try to imagine what this thing is...

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What If You’re Wrong and God Does Exist?

One of the most common arguments used by believers to support faith in God is known as Pascal’s Wager, named after the French philosopher Blaise Pascal who formulated the wager.1 The argument generally goes as such: “if you believe there is a god and you are proven wrong when you die, then nothing is lost; however, if you believe there is no god and you are proven wrong at death, then you could lose everything”. In other words, it is best to bet on the existence of God and not take chances with the possibility of burning in hell for all eternity...

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